June 10, 2009

Release of a conceptual framework for determining just how and where the state of Montana should spend $120 million in restoration funds in the upper Clark Fork River basin over the next couple of decades is still on hold.

The Montana Natural Resource Damage Program is an agency within the Dept. of Justice that oversees the administration of the lawsuit settlement  against the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) for injuries to the Upper Clark Fork’s water, soils, fish and wildlife. The lawsuit was filed in 1983 and the first settlement came in 1999 (which resulted in the creation of the grants program), another in 2005, and the most recent in 2008.

The three settlements provided about $231 million total for restoration of natural resources in the basin. Out of that amount, about $19 million is earmarked for litigation costs, about $92 million is earmarked for specific projects, and the remaining $120 million, plus interest, can be used to restore or replace injured natural resources and lost services throughout the basin.

In early 2008, the NRDP drafted a conceptual framework, or restoration Road Map, for allocating and prioritizing these funds. The Road Map proposed that funding be allocated proportionately for groundwater, terrestrial, and aquatic resource restoration projects based on the lawsuit claims and that restoration priorities be determined and then implemented in a 15-to-20 year timeframe. (For links to the Road Map, visit the NRDP's website.)

Between March and September 2008, the proposal was the subject of substantial deliberation by the Governor’s Upper Clark Fork Remediation and Restoration Advisory Council, the Governor’s Trustee Restoration Council, and then by the general public through four public hearings and a 60-day public comment period. The State received extensive comments on the proposal, with about half of them in support of the proposal and half of them seeking major changes to it.

In late 2008, the Governor directed the NRDP and the Advisory Council to try to work out a consensus Road Map proposal. The NRDP proposed three major changes to the draft Road Map proposal that were considered by the Advisory Council in January 2009 and Trustee Restoration Council in February 2009.

The Advisory Council reached a consensus vote on two of three proposed changes. The Trustee Restoration Council voted to defer a decision on the Road Map to allow for additional efforts to reach consensus. The Governor’s Office continues to work on those efforts.

thumb_powerhouse_demoAfter 20 years of study, debate and planning, on-the-ground work began at the Milltown Reservoir Superfund site in the summer of 2006. In just three years, the dam and most of the sediments proposed for removal are now gone. Here's how that happened:

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As of June 2009, more than 1.9 million cubic yards had been shipped from the Milltown site to the BP ARCO waste repository at the Anaconda Superfund site. More than two million cubic yards will shipped in total. At the repository, roughly 80,000 cubic yards of reservoir sediments are scooped daily from one train with 45 rail cars. The daily process of unloading, spreading, and seeding sediments will continue through late 2009. All in all, the material from Milltown will cover less than a quarter of the waste repository, or about 800 out of 4,000 total acres.

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After three years of cleanup work at the Milltown Reservoir Superfund site, the project has passed several major milestones. These aerial photos highlight some of that progress.

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State agencies involved in the upper Clark Fork River cleanup will host a public meeting...

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Welcome to the newly redesigned CFRTAC website. The new site will feature more news at a glance and better display of photos, as well incorporate multi-media content in the near future.

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ARCO and the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Dept. are still negotiating the renewal of a lapsed lease agreement that would provide maintenance for the recreational facilities at the Warm Springs Ponds (WSP).

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Now in its 10th year of grantmaking, the Montana Natural Resource Damage Program will award up to $15 million in grants for restoration and replacement projects, but has received 13 grant proposals totaling roughly $23 million.

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Redevelopment at the Milltown Superfund site continues to move forward with the effort to raise funds for state park amenities proposed at the confluence of the Clark Fork and Blackfoot Rivers.

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